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Geographical variation in the association between physical violence and sleep disturbance among adolescents: A population-based, sex-stratified analysis of data from 89 countries

  • Md. Mehedi Hasan
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: Md. Mehedi Hasan, PhD, The University of Queensland, Australia
    Affiliations
    Institute for Social Science Research, The University of Queensland, Indooroopilly, Queensland, Australia

    ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course (The Life Course Centre), The University of Queensland, Indooroopilly, Queensland, Australia

    Maternal and Child Health Division, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh
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  • Md. Tariqujjaman
    Affiliations
    Department of Statistics, The University of Dhaka, Bangladesh

    Nutrition and Clinical Services Division, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh
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  • Yaqoot Fatima
    Affiliations
    Institute for Social Science Research, The University of Queensland, Indooroopilly, Queensland, Australia

    ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course (The Life Course Centre), The University of Queensland, Indooroopilly, Queensland, Australia

    Centre for Rural and Remote Health, James Cook University, Mount Isa, Queensland, Australia
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  • Md. Rabiul Haque
    Affiliations
    Department of Population Science, The University of Dhaka, Bangladesh
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Published:January 18, 2023DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2022.11.007

      Abstract

      Objective

      To examine geographical variations in involvement in physical violence and sleep disturbance among adolescents.

      Design

      Cross-sectional study.

      Setting

      Eighty-nine low- to middle-income and high-income countries

      Participants

      Adolescents 13-17 years of age.

      Measurements

      Multiple binary logistic regression analyses and meta-analyses were performed to assess the link between physical violence (number of physical fights) and sleep disturbance ("mostly" or "always" experienced worry-induced sleep loss).

      Results

      Among 296,212 adolescents, 8.9% reported sleep disturbance (male: 7.5%, female: 9.6%), with the highest prevalence among adolescents from the Eastern Mediterranean region (14.1%) and high-income countries (14.1%). Overall, sleep disturbance prevalence increased gradually with the increased episodes of physical violence. Adolescents who were involved in physical violence once, 2-3 times, and 4+ times were respectively 18%, 26%, and 77% more likely than their counterparts to experience sleep disturbance (1 time: OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.13-1.24; 2-3 times: 1.26, 1.20-1.34; 4+ times: 1.77, 1.66-1.88). The association between physical violence and sleep disturbance was observed in all regions and country-income groups, with the highest odds of sleep disturbance among adolescents experiencing 4+ times of physical violence in the European region (2.34, 1.17-4.67) and upper-middle-income countries (1.91, 1.73-2.11). The association of physical violence with sleep disturbance by sex was significant in all regions and country-income groups, except the European region.

      Conclusions

      Exposure to physical violence is associated with increased odds of sleep disturbances in adolescents. School and community-level interventions, vigilance, and programs to promote violence-free environments may improve the sleep health of adolescents exposed to physical violence.

      Keywords

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